HARVEST HOME BOOK

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Harvest Home is a novel by Thomas Tryon, which he wrote following his critically acclaimed novel, The Other. Harvest Home was a New York Times bestseller. The book became an NBC mini-series in titled The Dark Secret of. Harvest Home book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. It was almost as if time had not touched the village of Cornwall Coom. Harvest Home [Thomas Tryon] on tranarkiptinan.gq *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Ned Constantine and his family abandon hectic New York for a tranquil.


Harvest Home Book

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Harvest Home: A Novel [Thomas Tryon] on tranarkiptinan.gq Harvest Home: A Novel and millions of other books are available for instant access. view site. Harvest Home Books is a publishing company in Massachusetts that features books about Cape Cod written by Jack Sheedy and James Coogan, Category. Harvest Home by Thomas Tryon (): What No Man May Know Nor . smarter, more polished book of the two (I haven't read any of Tryon's.

In the book, Beth is a strong, reflective, intelligent woman who seems to have her shit together and loves her husband despite his minor failings.

She only really turns against him at the very end, and perhaps understandably so, from her point of view. He does apologize when she seemingly gets pregnant, but still, the stench of his assholishness lingers.

There were some other niggling changes that bothered me quite a bit. In the movie, neighbor Robert is simply blind, with white eyes; in the novel, his eyes have been totally removed, which has far more horrifying implications in the context of the story. I was also kind of surprised that one of the most shocking scenes in the book was partly left out. In the movie, Nick gets ragingly drunk at the husking bee and runs off after he pisses off the townsfolk by pulling his daughter out of the dance.

Ending up in a stream, he is approached and seduced by Tamar. Angered by her aggressive advances and his helpless lust, he lamely attempts to drown her, but does not succeed. She tells no one about this.

However, in the book, that scene plays out a bit differently. He wanders off to the woods, totally sober and in broad daylight, and ends up swimming in the stream. He is approached by Tamar, who begins to work her feminine charms. He wants to kill her, and forces her down in the mud, where he brutally rapes her, wanting to obliterate her with his sexuality. He realizes during the rape that he cannot kill Tamar, and that she has triumphed over him because he has given her exactly what she wanted.

And until next time, Goddess out. They say that the farther north you go the closer you're related " before" you get married. Anyway one can see the connection to the now famous " Children of the Corn" story that I think thi I was in love with Tom Tryon as a little girl after renting" Sky Pilot" but anyway, this was thriller when it was written.

Anyway one can see the connection to the now famous " Children of the Corn" story that I think this "spawned", sorry bad joke Anyway it's been done to death since then, as all good stories often are done, again and again, but this is where it started, in the US anyway. View 1 comment. I never thought I would finish this book.

I understand building the setting and atmosphere, but it was just way too uneventful for me. I'm giving their house a fall cleanin'. Now all I got to do is catch that coon, then swarm the bees back, and come spring there'll start to be plenty of honey in the pot.

By the end of the book she's caught her raccoons, but there's more blood than honey soaking the corn husks in this rustic New England community. The book is written in a rambling stream of "Some dratted raccoons have been playing havoc and eating up my honeybees. The book is written in a rambling stream of visual cues that's usually quite absorbing, but can occasionally become frustrating to read when Mr.

Tryon forgets to make sentences: It's not a sympathetic portrait as this narrator goes beyond unreliable all the way over to reprehensible, adding one more layer of confusion to the carefully crafted mystery and the building sense of paranoia. I suspect it's a device designed to distract attention from the increasingly unbelievable way none, of so many cousins in the tiny town, seem to react to or be affected by any of the compounding tragedies as the bodies pile up.

However, a lot of the plot had me rolling my eyes, and the subject matter at times was a bit much. I'm not into horror because it contains scenes of gore, or rape. This book, while had little gore, did have extreme sexual overtones that killed what would have made me get over the slight silliness of the plot.

I wouldn't steer clear from this author, but would not recommend this book to many, if anyone. If it "Corny" and Ridiculous To be brief and to the point, I loved the way the book was written.

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If it wasn't for the at times beautifully written words, and dramatic scenes I would have given it 2 stars. If the plot revolved less around it being sexually horrific towards most of the end of the book, I would have given it 4 stars. Overall, not horrible, but far from great or thought provoking. Not my favorite A bit laborious. There's a lot of detail to fill in the background but it took forever to reach the anti climactic end.

Though interesting for the most part it had a hard time keeping my attention. This story starts out with a husband, wife, and daughter looking for a house away from the big city, and eventually moving to a small town in New England where everyone living there holds fast to old traditions and beliefs. It's a slow telling and you need some patience to get through the first half of the book where there are a few clues to the rest of the story.

Harvest Home

I found the women misogynistic and controlling, and the storyline reminded me of a movie that ran along these same lines. The widow's This story starts out with a husband, wife, and daughter looking for a house away from the big city, and eventually moving to a small town in New England where everyone living there holds fast to old traditions and beliefs. The widow's character is the only one I found believable and predictable, and the ending did come as a surprise for me. I eventually liked it, but got irritated that it took so long to get there.

I am sorry to say that I saw this book in movie format about 20 years ago starring Bette Davis and I loved the movie. If you haven't seen the movie then I think that you will love this book. Very creepy and the characters are well fleshed out. What I read of I am sorry to say that I saw this book in movie format about 20 years ago starring Bette Davis and I loved the movie.

What I read of it was very good and enjoyable though and I may go back and finish it even knowing how the end turns out. I picked this up because it was on sale at site and it brought me back to my teenage years when I first read it and was entranced. I thought I might have the same experience. This time, not so much. To my mind, the prose a bit on the purple side and the narrative could have been tightened considerably. In its favor, though, I will say that the ending still packed a wallop.

A city boy falls from grace after uncovering the secrets of the pagan corn-n-quilting cult that runs the farming village he and his family now call home. Apparently, the corn just won't grow unless the biggest-dicked farmer in town is ritualistically fucked then murdered every so often.

It's the circle of life. A pretty good pulp psychological horror story. A really old book, a book I read recently, A Cold Season, triggered a memory of it, and I wanted to read it again.

It's not as graphic as current novels, but keeps you interested. It's a good pool or beach read. This story was Not a bad read. Just very odd. It was! This this a seriously chilling book, well written and totally compelling. I'm probably just jaded but Harvest Home's terrible secret view spoiler [they sacrifice a man every 7 years to mother nature hide spoiler ] didn't seem that horrifying. Predictable ending but with enjoyable characters along the way -especially widow Fortune. Some of the descriptive prose is lovely though that's also part of what slows the pace , in stark contrast to I never really cared for the main character, but that didn't keep me from enjoying the book.

This is definitely an adult horror novel that I would not recommend to either younger fans of the genre or those offended by sexual content. Possibly the biggest age-related distraction for me was the protagonist's own name-- Ned. It's such an old-sounding name for a youngish man! It was startling, every time his name was mentioned.

Because the setting is so rural, antiquated, and unusual-- a throwback even when the book was written-- there weren't that many references to "current events", pop culture, or outdated technology, aside from the oft-mentioned "books-on-record". Even the whole "back to the earth" movement that Ned refers to has had a little of a modern revival.

Today's version isn't exactly the same, but it's close enough to remind the reader that there's nothing new under the sun. Were these plot points less expected back then, perhaps? It was immediately clear to me that view spoiler [the residents of Cornwall Coombe were involved in some strange beliefs related to the corn. Fertility rites? Blood sacrifice? Oh, how shocking.

Who could ever have foreseen these mind-shattering developments? Still, for a while, I was hopeful that it wasn't a whole-town lunacy.

The red herring of the odious Soakes family did its job effectively, too. While I knew something involving sacrifice was coming up, I wasn't sure exactly how it would all play out-- who would take which role-- and I have to admit that I'm surprised the author chose as dark an ending as he did. If it's ever precisely mentioned, I've forgotten it. I suppose she's meant to be an odd character, with her psychosomatic illness and all, but even so On the one hand, she's old enough to be flirting mildly with Worthy and hoping he'll ask her on a date.

Yet she sulks like a toddler, dances around on the lawn shouting something about "moon madness", and calls her parents "daddy" and "mummy".

He puts himself into odd situations with her-- and just about every time he sees her, he ends up repeatedly referring in his internal monologue to certain aspects of her body. Her red fingernails, red lips-- and especially her breasts. It's blatant enough to become distracting and outright annoying. I mean, good grief, dude! We get it-- as a woman, she has boobs. Try to focus on something else! So, having drunk too much, Ned puts him into an awkward position inside Tamar's house, where he proceeds to drink some more like the idiot that he is.

He's practically ogling her, she puts the moves on him, and of course, because he's a jerk, he responds. He manages to pull himself away before anything too serious has happened, but come on! And then, when his wife realizes what he's been up to and confronts him? In his innocence?! You're not that innocent, Ned. Then there's the scene between Ned and Tamar at the river. Completely bizarre and unpleasantly creepy. First of all, he ends up skinny-dipping through the most contrived of circumstances-- and when Tamar comes along, instead of leaving, he stays, even though he suspects that she murdered a woman several years ago.

The entire scene is by turns disgusting and unintentionally hilarious. As hateful as Tamar is, there's no possible excuse for Ned's unhinged behavior. At best, he's cheating on his wife after he specifically promised not to have anything more to do with Tamar. At worst, he's kinda-sorta raping Tamar. The whole thing is incredibly disturbing and misogynistic. He notices that Beth, his wife, is staring at him. Her face was pale; she needed lipstick. What the? You come home from cheating on your wife and when you notice she's pale, your first thought is that she needs lipstick?

Heaven forbid that she not be optimally pleasing to the eye at all times. This kind of crap makes me not care what happens to him later on, to be honest It suddenly seemed different-- not a room we had made, part of our house, but-- simply a room.

I glanced at Beth; she seemed different too, somehow. A stranger-wife. Yes, it must be she who has changed.

Couldn't possibly be a reflection of a change in yourself. He might be the only character I really liked in this whole darn book-- and even he was a let-down. Why did he confide in anyone , knowing the risks? It wasn't smart. It became almost a joke in the last quarter of the book. He was always so shocked! Yeah, sure, he knows that Tamar killed Gracie.

He knows that the women were responsible for cutting out the peddler's tongue and sewing his mouth shut. Oh no, the townspeople killed Worthy! I'll give this 2 stars as it is very well written but I only give it 2 stars as I don't care for this type of book. If you want a creeping belly drop horror with no redeeming qualities or anything uplifting in the ending to relieve the stress, only one that leaves the horror intact It's not mine.

I read this at a time of what might be called "undue stress" anyway and it effected me very badly. I've got to say that due to the combination of the book's story and the situation I'll give this 2 stars as it is very well written but I only give it 2 stars as I don't care for this type of book. I've got to say that due to the combination of the book's story and the situation I was in, this book probably left me more profoundly depressed than any other novel I can think of since childhood and Old Yeller'.

It only escapes a 1 star rating because I recognize that it is well written and my reaction won't be everyone's. This will be just what some of you are looking for. Still, a gut-wrenching story that stayed with me negatively for some time. I didn't read anything else by Tryon though my wife wanted to see the movie of The Other, I found it almost as depressing and it was the movie so Aug 07, Addy rated it it was amazing Shelves: Man this book was awesome.

It had that magical feel in the beginning that was just beautiful and mysterious. Though slow with the scares, when it finally came it hit you like a ton of bricks! The mystery of Grace Everdeen had me guessing throughout and the ending is sure to blow your mind, even though it was predictable. Thomas Tryon was a great treasure to find within the horror genre. I continue to be entertained with his books and I certainly won't look at corn the same way nor will I envy si Man this book was awesome.

I continue to be entertained with his books and I certainly won't look at corn the same way nor will I envy simple living as much!

At least, not without thinking of this book. View all 4 comments. Oct 13, El rated it really liked it Shelves: About 10 years ago, we were driving to a small town in western PA to visit a friend's brother's glass-blowing studio. At some point we made a wrong turn and wound up on a rather neat looking street with perfectly mowed lawns, historic houses with large, comfortable-appearing front porches, and even an occasional picket fence or so.

While beautiful and charming, it struck me that this was the sort of neighborhood that was its own community, and that they may not be so friendly towards outsiders.

We hadn't particularly seen anyone, so that feeling was entirely unfounded, but I sometimes get a feel for the mood of a place and can tell when I'm not welcome.

Knowing we needed to turn around, we pulled into a driveway to quickly look at the map before moving on. As my partner did that, I looked around and saw in the passenger side rear view mirror a little girl standing across the street. She was just standing there, looking at us. Being a fan of horror movies, I expected to turn around in my seat to find that there was no one really there, and then turn back and look again in the mirror only to have her right there next to my window.

But she was really there, standing there across the street, staring at us silently. It was unnerving. I pointed her out to my partner and we both nervously giggled. There was something not quite right about the way this little girl was watching us. You'd think little girls in patent leather shoes couldn't be that bad, but obviously you have never seen a horror movie, nor do you have an overactive imagination. I know from my vast experience in the horror realm that children are full of evil.

A few moments later, confident in where we needed to go, we pulled out of the driveway with a warning from me to make sure the little girl hadn't darted into the street behind us and drove back down the street to get back to the main road. I watched the girl in the mirror the entire time and could see that she watched us the entire time as well. I can't be sure, but I'm pretty sure she put a curse on us. I thought about that devil's spawn little girl throughout reading this book.

Ned and Beth and their asthmatic teenage daughter, Kate, have an opportunity to move into a Colonial house in Cornwall Coombe, a seemingly bucolic village. The price was right, the family loved it, and the neighbors Over time, however, the Constantines really settle in and become a part of the community.

There is a little girl in town who does point at Ned with her hands covered in the blood and viscera of chickens at one point which seems a bit unusual, at least to Ned, but everyone else is pretty okay with this. I have a penchant for novels about strange communities that are closed to outsiders and are full of secrets.

Towns and villages that have these old ideas and traditions and don't like outsiders with all their city-thinkin'. I love that shit. Because it feels so real in all of its creepy glory. I love road trips, and I enjoy usually finding these old fashioned towns that have otherwise been forgotten by time. I like to imagine their stories, all of which involve some sort of sacrificial ceremony because that's what happens in all small towns, right? I wasn't necessarily a fan of Tryon's characterizations here.

Ned and his family are relatively well-written, and the little girl with the bloody hands is appropriately freaky if not a bit stereotypical cause all mentally impaired children are considered freakish, y'know?

If you're considering downloading a historic house in an old village and everyone seems really open to you living there, and the house is super cheap, you might investigate the town and its inhabitants as well as their beliefs and superstitions before signing the paperwork and moving in the furniture.

Just sayin'. I already want to re-read this it was that good. I developed a migraine, put the book down and didn't pick it back up for 7 days.

So a re-read is definitely in order. This creepy story has me seriously reconsidering my move to a small town: Jun 27, Andrea Petrullo rated it it was ok Shelves: I was pretty dissapointed with Harvest Home. It wasn't bad, but I had hoped for better. I read it because I'd heard the original Wicker Man movie was loosley based on it. The story itself moved pretty slowly, which I can deal with, but Tryon's long tangents about painting and scenery had me bored to tears, and I found myself skipping over paragraphs at a time.

Beyone that, the main character was really dumb.

It really bothered me. The scene towards the end where he witnesses the secret ritual in I was pretty dissapointed with Harvest Home. The scene towards the end where he witnesses the secret ritual in the woods reminded me of Lovecraft. That degenerating speech thing is straight out of The Rats in the Walls. The highlight of this whole book was a really bizarre and random two or three paragraphs describing violent hate sex between the narrator and the town whore. It was just hilarious. There's no way to write a scene like that without it being really funny or really disturbing, and this one leaned more towards being funny.

Highly recommended Oct 28, Grady Hendrix rated it really liked it. Set in a sleepy Connecticut village, it kicks off with artist Ned, his wife, and their daughter ditching dirty old New York City for the rural paradise of Cornwall Coombe, which appears to be the town that time forgot. In a trope that readers will by now be all-too-familiar with, it turns out that the town takes its corn harvest a little too seriously.

Read the rest of this review.

Oct 28, Cody codysbookshelf rated it it was ok Shelves: Didn't much care for this one, though I suspect it's more a matter of where I'm currently at than the book itself. The writing is beautiful; the setting is divine; I did not care for any of the characters, sad to say. And the story moves at a snail's pace. The first pages or so are an absolute chore, Tryon's marvelous descriptive skills aside. I love this author's other bestseller, The Other that one is quite possibly my favorite horror novel — period , so I hate that I couldn't really groo Didn't much care for this one, though I suspect it's more a matter of where I'm currently at than the book itself.

I love this author's other bestseller, The Other that one is quite possibly my favorite horror novel — period , so I hate that I couldn't really groove on Harvest Home. Maybe I'll reread it next fall. Apr 18, Randolph rated it really liked it Shelves: A good tale well told. Everyone is in on the joke except the narrator kind of thing. The ending is telegraphed early on so there are really no surprises but it becomes a page turner nonetheless.

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Tryon throws us one red herring in the Soakes but you see through it pretty early and then half way through he just hands it to you. The key to a novel like this is characterization. We need to invest in certain A good tale well told. We need to invest in certain characters for the payoff to stick.

We need to care. Tryon does this well here. It isn't really necessary to invoke the supernatural for this to work but clearly Tryon wants us to believe in at least Missy's clairvoyance. On no other level does it really require any stretching of belief. The harvest's rise and fall could just be coincidence.

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People have actually believed this rubbish for centuries. The murders and rapes aside, is the Mother Earth worship any more silly than other fictions we fool ourselves into believing will make the universe make sense? Jun 09, Steve rated it it was amazing. Alright all you nay-Sayers and "can I give this negative star" idiots Put yourself in the shoes of readers 40 years ago.

This was what city-folk were doing in droves back then Eventually there were so many city folk moving to the country that the characters in this book died or assimilated. This was an excellent portrait of country folk beating back and m Alright all you nay-Sayers and "can I give this negative star" idiots This was an excellent portrait of country folk beating back and murdering those that threatened their simple way of life. I thought that it was a fun read.

Read this for a good, old-fashioned if you call the 70's old , suspenseful page-turner!

I still might change this to a 5 star. This is one of the best books I have read and its all because of a recommendation by my Friend Skye.. Thank you Dear Lady: Tryon seduces readers into a sense of contentment, then slaps them in the face with unspeakable horror. As we readers, along with the main character, slowly unravel a mystery, we become totally immersed in this page-turner written in ,.

View all 6 comments. Dec 06, Sheila rated it it was amazing Shelves: Trigger warnings for sexual violence and a slight dash of misogyny a product of the time it was written, likely. My favorite genre--small-town villagers doing spooky, culty things.

The Dark Secret of Harvest Home

This is a mild and slow-paced horror novel--there's not a lot of scary stuff at first--but the ending is utterly perfect and terrifying. This book is basically a novelization of The Golden Bough , which I love. I'm glad I finally read this classic! Oct 13, Cheryl rated it it was ok. Strange happenings in the New England farming village of Cornwall Coombe. If you're a fan of the movies The Wicker Man and Children of the Corn, you might like this book, which has a similar theme.

I thought the book could've been at least pages shorter, as the pace was very slow in the first half of the book. It picked up towards the end, though. The characters were one-dimensional, so I really wasn't invested in what happened to them.

Parts of the story were more sexually explicit than I Strange happenings in the New England farming village of Cornwall Coombe. Parts of the story were more sexually explicit than I am comfortable with. I think this book could've been alot better than it was. Well written although it took quite a while to get into the story itself. Artist Ned Constantine his wife and daughter settle in the picturesque village of Cornwall Coombe. Unfortunately appearances are deceptive and life in Cornwall Coombe proves to be anything but idyllic.

Didn't feel this was quite up to the standard of The Other also written by Tryon. WOW at this book. I'll write more later on my phone at the moment. This is not that kind of book. This novel is not without its problems. Although I have never studied the history of feminism, I am willing to bet that a modern feminist scholar would find a lot to dissect here.And though he was a man and was used to being in charge and decisive, it made him uncomfortable to see his wife and daughter growing apart from him, and women being in charge of this village.

I vowed death and destruction. At church, Worthy shouts out a curse upon the corn before fleeing. This unsettling tale swirls beneath everything that happens, a dark secret Ned pieces together himself.

Their daughter Kate can have a horse, Beth can learn new crafts, and Ned has plenty of beautiful landscapes and interesting faces to sketch for his burgeoning career in the galleries back in the city. Tryon writes a novel which unfolds slowly.

I'll write more later on my phone at the moment. Didn't feel this was quite up to the standard of The Other also written by Tryon.

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